Dragon and Phoenix

    dragon_and_phoenix

    The most prominent of all Chinese marriage symbols is the pairing of a dragon (long 龙) and a phoenix (feng 凤) which represents love and a happy marriage.

    The dragon is the preeminent male or yang (阳) symbol and represents strength and the warmth of the sun.

    The phoenix, as you might expect, is the ultimate female or yin (阴) symbol.

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Double Happiness Symbol

Double Happiness Symbol

The symbol of Double Happiness is an expression that the bride and the groom are to be united, as well as their families.

The “Double Happiness” symbol is usually found displayed at Chinese wedding celebrations whether in a traditional or more contemporary setting.

The Double Happiness symbol is composed of two standard Chinese characters. Each of the characters that denote happiness is written as “hsi” or “xi” in Mandarin. In the case of the Double Happiness sign, the two “XI” characters signify the happiness of the newlywed couple that are about to spend their lives together. Pronounced as “shuang-xi”, the sign generally stands for marital happiness.

Note that the Double Happiness sign is not used in regular Mandarin writing, but is only observed for marital union invitations and declarations.

The Story of “Doubled” Happiness

The story of the Double Happiness sign originates from a student’s journey during the Tang Dynasty. According to the story, a young man who was about to take a final examination but became ill on his way to the capital city. Fortunately he was helped by a herbalist doctor and his daughter. However, the girl did not just help him to heal she also made him fall in love with her.

Because the girl was in love with the young man, she wanted to make sure that the he was her perfect match. So before the boy left for the capital city, the girl wrote a part of a rhyming couplet on paper, with the hopes that the young man can find his perfect match.

At the examination, the young man was able to achieve first place. When the emperor came to assess the young man’s skill, he asked him to finish a couplet. Fortunately, the part of the couplet that the emperor gave the boy was the missing match to his love’s rhyme.

The boy recited the part of the couplet that the girl wrote for him. Pleased with the young man’s answer, the emperor made the young man one of his Ministers. But before taking his post, the young man went back to the girl and recited her couplet’s match.

Then they got happily married. During their traditional Chinese wedding, the couple wrote the character “XI” twice on a red piece of paper. They posted it on the wall and since then, that double “XI” became the Double Happiness sign, symbolizing the “doubled” happiness that the couple felt because of their union.

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BEYOND MOTIVATION delivers usable techniques for personal and group development that helps individuals and groups increase their productivity by recognizing that working with others is an exchange of energy.

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China Lily

White China Lily, China, Chinese, marriage, love

The white lily symbolises “Love for all seasons” and is widely used in Chinese weddings.

In China the lily flower is a symbol of motherly love and also symbolizes the beauty of women.

In addition, the lily also represents the purity of the soul.

The color of the lily is very rich and most Chinese people link the white lily with innocence and sweetness.

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BEYOND MOTIVATION delivers usable techniques for personal and group development that helps individuals and groups increase their productivity by recognizing that working with others is an exchange of energy.

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Yue Lao – The Matchmaker

Yue Lao - The Matchmaker

Yue Lao, The Matchmaker, is the god who unites persons in marriage.

Yue Lao translates as The Old Man in the Moon.

According to Chinese legend Yue Lao, The Matchmaker, holds a book in his hands called “the book of fate”, on which the marriage of all people are recorded. Also in his hands there is a red strand, and once he ties a man and a woman on their feet with the strand, the two will surely become a couple even if they were once irreconcilable enemies or strangers far away from each other.

In China lovers make statues of The Matchmaker and build temples to pray for blessings. There is such a temple by the West Lake of Hangzhou, in which people can burn joss sticks, draw straws and vow to the god for their marriage.

BEYOND MOTIVATION
by James T. McCay
with Richard E. Ward

BEYOND MOTIVATION delivers usable techniques for personal and group development that helps individuals and groups increase their productivity by recognizing that working with others is an exchange of energy.

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