Prayer

Prayer is something that almost everyone does when things are tough and they are overwhelmed – even if they don’t want to admit to praying.

I am going to be exploring prayer in these pages using approaches to pray and prayers that I have learned in a number of different traditions including Anglicanism, Pure Land Buddhism, Science of Mind, Taoism, Tibetan Buddhism, and Shamanism.

What is Prayer?

What is prayer? Prayer is an intensely personal communication with a higher source of power. For some this power maybe experienced as God, Creator, Great Spirit,Universal Mind, and so forth. For others it may be a personal deity or saint.

Prayers no matter what the culture deal with the most intense human needs and experiences including entreaties for material benefits, supplications for blessings, requests for opportunities, honouring Spirit, unburdening grief, releasing guilt, unloading afflication, woshipping, affirmaing desires, offering gratitude, wishing for escape from pain and suffering, and decreeing how things will be.

People of all races, genders, creeds, and cultures pray in many forms and styles.

Exploring Prayer

Learn more about prayer:

Pryaer with Richard Edward Ward

Spiritual Development Tools

Learn about other Spiritual Development Tools:

Anglican Church of Canada

The Anglican Church of Canada a Christian church, is an independent, self-governing church in communion with the other 44 churches of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

Anglican Church of Canada

The Anglican Communion includes more than 500,000 members in 1,700 parishes, and like Canada, the church has become culturally diverse. On any given Sunday the tradition of common prayer is expressed across Canada in many languages, including Inuktitut, French, Spanish, and Cree.

The Anglican Church of Canada has its roots in The Church of England, which separated from the Roman Catholic Church in the 16th century.

Book of Common Prayer

Influenced by the Protestant Reformation, the new English church simplified rituals and introduced the Book of Common Prayer (1549), which enabled services in English instead of Latin.

At the same time, the church preserved certain traditions, including the early church creeds and the succession of bishops from the line of the apostles. Because of this history, Anglicanism is sometimes referred to as “Reformed Catholicism.”